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UEA Report on the 2014 Utah Legislature General Session

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WEEK SEVEN:

2014 LEGISLATURE WEEK SEVEN SUMMARY: March 10-13

It’s a wrap. The 2014 Utah Legislature closed at midnight Thursday, March 13, with a flurry of activity. Legislators unveiled and passed the public education budget and took action on nearly 50 education-related bills.

Public Education Budget: After canceling nine of its previous 10 scheduled meetings, the Executive Appropriations Committee finally presented a state budget on Monday, March 10. The public education supplemental appropriation (see draft) includes a 2.5 percent increase on the Weighted Pupil Unit (WPU), funds new student growth and renews funding for teacher supply money. It does not fund a separate line item for retirement or restore professional development days.

Committee Chair Sen. Lyle Hillyard said there will be $134.5 million in ongoing funding for public education, including $62 million for student enrollment growth and $62.5 million to pay for the WPU increase. The bill also calls for $5 million in one-time funding for teacher supplies. “Our priority is, was, and always will be public education,” Sen. Hillyard said. (See more about the budget)

Concert Sponsorship: The UEA Legislative Team celebrated the final day of the 2014 Legislature by sponsoring a performance by the singing group Beyond 5. They performed during lunchtime in the Capitol Rotunda. The Legislative Team also arranged for the band to have a private meeting with the Governor and Lieutenant Governor.

Bills on the move this week
(For the current status on all bills of interest see the UEA Legislative Tracking Sheet)

  • HB3: Appropriations Adjustments passed the Senate 28-0. This bill provides budget increases and decreases for state agencies, public education, higher education and funds for bills with fiscal impact passed during the 2014 session.
  • HB4: Current School Year Supplemental Public Education Budget Amendments passed the Senate unanimously. This bill modifies education funding for school districts, charter schools and certain state agencies for the 2013-14 fiscal year.
  • HB84 (1st Sub.): School District Amendments failed in the Senate on second reading. The bill would have made the process for creating a new school district similar to that for creating a city.
  • HB96: Utah School Readiness Initiative passed the Senate 17-10. This bill creates the School Readiness Board, which provides grants for early childhood education programs, and may enter into certain contracts with private entities to provide funding for early childhood education programs for at-risk students. HB96 has a $3 million fiscal note, to come from the General Fund.
  • HB111: School Building Cost Reporting passed the Senate unanimously. This bill enacts language to require a local education agency to submit a capital outlay report for publication on the Utah Public Finance Website.
  • HB150 (3rd Sub.): Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Amendments passed the Senate. The bill, which carries a $20 million fiscal note, includes high quality professional development for educators related to STEM education in grades K-12, creates financial incentives for educators to earn an elementary or secondary STEM education endorsement, and expands the scope of STEM education to include students in grades 7 and 8.
  • HB168 (1st Sub.): School and Institutional Trust Lands and Funds Management Provisions creates a quasi-public entity to manage the school trust land funds. The bill passed the House and Senate unanimously.
  • HB170: Local School Board Bond Amendments would require school districts to have a binding priority list prior to any bond levy. If projects are changed or priorities change it will require a two-thirds majority of the school board to allow it. The bill passed the House 49-19 and the Senate unanimously.
  • HB192: Initiative and Referendum Petition Amendments passed the Senate on a 23-5 vote. The bill adds a statement to a statewide or local initiative petition signature sheet stating that the signer has read, understands and agrees to the law proposed by the petition, or that the signer has read and understands the law the petition seeks to overturn.
  • HB286 (2nd Sub.): Child Sexual Abuse Prevention passed the Senate 20-8. This bill requires the State Board of Education to approve instructional materials for child sexual abuse prevention and awareness training and instruction.
  • HB337: Teacher Salary Supplement Program Amendments passed the Senate. This bill replaces the Department of Human Resource Management with the State Board of Education as the administrator of the Teacher Salary Supplement Program.
  • HB342 (2nd Sub.): Powers and Duties of the State Board of Education passed the Senate 22-4. The bill requires the State Board of Education to establish a timeline for the review of core curriculum standards by a newly-established standards review committee; and directs the Board to take into consideration the comments and recommendations of the review committee in adopting core curriculum standards.
  • HB397: Student and Family Privacy Amendments prohibits school personnel from asking students if their family owns a gun. It also says that school personnel cannot offer inducements for students to return surveys on prohibited items. The bill passed the House 65-8 but was not heard in the Senate.
  • HB409: Statewide Education Coordinating Committee calls for the creation of a committee to meet at least twice a year. Legislative leaders and state educational system leaders would form the committee and the governor would chair it. The bill passed the House 39-33 but was not heard in the Senate.
  • HB417: English Language Arts Instructional Tool would direct $1 million from the Education Fund to provide an interactive, web-based technology tool for English language arts instructional tool for students in grades 4-12. It would be a voluntary program for districts. The bill passed the House 49-23 but was not heard in the Senate.
  • HB423: School District Post Employment Health Insurance Benefit Amendments requires school districts to fund their post-employment insurance benefits. If they don’t follow the requirements, then they must close them to new employees. Bill passed the House 57-15, but was not heard in the Senate.
  • HB425: State Educational Sovereignty Act prohibits a local school official from entering into a federal education agreement if the State Board of Education has disallowed participation in the federal program implemented in the federal education agreement. The bill passed the House 42-31 but was not heard in the Senate.
  • HCR10: Concurrent Resolution on School and Institutional Trust Lands Exchange Act passed the Senate 26-0. This concurrent resolution of the Legislature and the Governor urges the United States Congress to enact legislation affirming the federal land grant process and eliminating barriers to federal-state land exchanges.
  • HJR21: Joint Resolution on the Sovereign Character of PILT passed the Senate by a vote of 22-2. This bill strongly urges the U.S. Congress to fully and permanently fund Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) and transfer to the state of the Utah the federally controlled public lands within the state.
  • SB2: Public Education Budget Amendments passed the Senate and the House unanimously. The bill funds supplemental appropriations including $134.5 million in ongoing funding for public education, $62 million for student enrollment growth and $62.5 million to pay for a 2.5 percent increase in the Weighted Pupil Unit (WPU). The bill also calls for $5 million in one-time funding for teacher supplies.
  • SB34 (3rd Sub.): Statewide Data Alliance and Utah Futures passed the Senate then initially failed in the House 16-48. After an amendment, the bill was reconsidered and passed the House 69-5. The UEA opposed the original bill, but not the amended bill.
  • SB37: Statewide Online Education Program Revisions would require that public schools provide information about online education options. The bill failed in the House 20-50. Several education organizations opposed this bill including school boards’, superintendents’ and principals’ associations.
  • SB38 (1st Sub.): Snow College Concurrent Enrollment Amendments requires Snow College to establish a concurrent enrollment program that will allow students to be able to earn an Associate’s Degree via distance learning in a two-year cycle. The bill passed the House unanimously.
  • SB39 (1st Sub.): Home School Amendments modifies procedures for excusing from public school attendance a school-age minor who attends a home school, eliminates instructional requirements, and specifies procedures for the placement of a home school student who transfers to a public school. The bill passed the House 52-17.
  • SB40 (1st Sub.): Financial and Economic Literacy Amendments requires an online end-of-course assessment, professional development for the teachers and an endorsement program for financial literacy. It also provides for the course to be included in the core curriculum. The bill passed the House 62-6.
  • SB43: Intergenerational Poverty Interventions in Public Schools establishes a grant program providing after-school programs for students living in situations of intergenerational poverty. The bill allocates $1 million for a grant program available to school districts based upon criteria to be developed by USOE. It passed the House 68-2.
  • SB56 (1st Sub.): Risk Management Amendments says that a school is not held liable when the building is used for a civic activity. The bill passed the House 65-6.
  • SB74: Career and Technical Education Funding for Charter Schools would restrict the funding to charter schools that focuses on early high school and technical education, allowing a charter school to receive CTE funding for students enrolled. It was not heard by the House.
  • SB74: Career and Technical Education Funding for Charter Schools restricts the funding to charter schools that focuses on early high school and technical education. This allows a charter school to receive CTE funding for students enrolled. It passed the Senate unanimously but was not heard by the House.
  • SB80 (1st Sub.): Statewide Online Education Amendments would define what an IEP is for a special education online student and what dual enrollment is for a special education student who takes online courses and courses from the local school district or charter school. The failed in the House 11-61.
  • SB93 (1st Sub): Internal Audit Amendments establishes the Governor’s Office of Internal Audit Services and enacts provisions related to the auditing of state agencies and school districts. It passed the House by a vote of 40-31. The UEA opposed this bill.
  • SB101: Public Education Human Resource Management Amendments extends the deadline for full implementation of the new evaluation system by one year. The bill passed the House unanimously. This was one of the UEA’s priority bills.
  • SB104: Improvement of Reading Instruction was amended to provide $475,000 to expand the University of Utah Reading Clinic. The bill passed the House 70-2.
  • SB113: Public Meetings Amendments ensures that official meetings held at the Capitol Complex by different groups that include legislators are published on the main Capitol schedule. The bill passed the House 49-21.
  • SB122 (2nd Sub.): Parental Rights in Public Education specifies certain rights of parents, including the right to retain a student on grade level, make teacher requests, excuse absences for vacations and health care, and accommodate the parent’s determination of level of rigor. The UEA worked extensively with the sponsor to create a bill that was acceptable to teachers. It passed the House 68-1.
  • SB131 (1st Sub.): Student Leadership Grant would renew this program. The bill passed the House 67-1.
  • SB131 (1st Sub.): Student Leadership Grant requires a school that receives a grant to set school-wide goals for the student leadership skills development program. The bill passed the House 67-1.
  • SB140: Advanced Placement Testing provides funding for Advanced Placement test fees for low income students. The UEA supported this bill. It passed the House 65-4.
  • SB150: Education Task Force Reauthorization allows for the continuation of the Education Task Force for another year. The bill passed the House unanimously.
  • SB157: School-Based Budgeting Amendments failed in the Senate by a vote of 11-17. The bill would have required a school district to distribute no less than 85 percent of Minimum School Program revenues to schools. The UEA opposed the bill.
  • SB171: Student-centered Learning Pilot Program appropriated $275,000 to create a pilot blended learning, competency-based model on an extended-year school schedule. It passed the Senate but was not heard by the House. The UEA opposed this bill.
  • SB202: Charter School Funding Amendments failed in the Senate by a vote of 14-14. The bill would have increased the percentage of district per pupil local revenues that a school district is required to contribute for each resident student enrolled in a charter school. The UEA opposed this bill.
  • SB209: School Grading Revisions makes changes to the school grading law passed last year. It passed the House 62-12.
  • SB218: Charter School Amendments gives priority to charter schools in a high growth area and lower priority for charter schools in low or no growth areas. The bill passed the House 67-4.
  • SB232: School Safety Tip Line provides for the creation of a statewide phone number (311) to provide a means for a public school student, parent, school employee, or citizen to make an anonymous report concerning unsafe, violent, or criminal activities, or the threat of such activities. It passed the Senate unanimously and the House 67-2.
  • SB240: Carson Smith Scholarship Amendments passed the House 69-3. The bill changes requirements relating to the application deadline for the Carson Smith Scholarship Program.
  • SB257: Parent Review of Instructional Materials and Curriculum would require a parent panel to hear complaints about public school curriculum and have the State Board of Education publish a report of these complaints on its website. It narrowly passed the House 38-37.
  • SB258: Educator Licensure Amendments originally would have provided that educators from another state who provide distance learning are not required to obtain a license issued by the State Board of Education. The bill was amended to say that online teaching satisfies the work experience requirement for participation in an alternative preparation program. It passed the House 69-6.
  • SJR12: Joint Resolution on State Superintendent of Public Instruction would have the state school superintendent appointed by the Governor and approved by the Senate. It passed the Senate but was not heard by the House. The UEA opposed this bill.

 


March 10, 2014

Executive Appropriations Committee (Reported by Jay Blain and Mike Kelley): After canceling nine of its last 10 scheduled meetings, the Executive Appropriations Committee finally presented a state budget. The public education supplemental appropriation (see draft) includes a 2.5 percent increase on the Weighted Pupil Unit (WPU), funds new student growth and renews funding for teacher supply money. It does not fund a separate line item for retirement or restore professional development days.

House Floor (Reported by Tom Nedreberg and Jay Blain): HB417: English Language Arts Instructional Tool would direct $1 million from the Education Fund to provide an interactive, web-based technology tool for English language arts instructional tool for students in grades 4-12. It would be a voluntary program for districts. The bill passed 49-23.

HB170: Local School Board Bond Amendments would require school districts to have a binding priority list prior to any bond levy. If projects are changed or priorities change it will require a two-thirds majority of the school board to allow it. The bill passed 49-19.

HB397: Student and Family Privacy Amendments prohibits school personnel from asking students if their family owns a gun. It also says that school personnel cannot offer inducements for students to return surveys on prohibited items. Rep. Dana Layton based this bill on an app that asked people to report on their neighbors who own guns and then built a map of that area. Rep. Carol Moss asked why we need a statute to do this, not just a State School Board Rule. The bill passed on to the Senate 65-8.

HB423: School District Post Employment Health Insurance Benefit Amendments requires school districts to fund their post-employment insurance benefits. If they don’t follow the requirements, then they must close them to new employees. Bill passed on to the Senate 57-15.

HB409: Statewide Education Coordinating Committee calls for the creation of a committee to meet at least twice a year. Legislative leaders and state educational system leaders would form the committee and the governor would chair it. The bill passed on to the Senate 39-33.

HB168 (1st Sub.): School and Institutional Trust Lands and Funds Management Provisions creates a quasi-public entity to manage the school trust land funds. There would be a five member board of trustees with a fiduciary responsibility over the trust land funds. The state treasurer would be the chair. Rep. Rich Cunningham pointed out that we could probably increase the return by at least 2 percent by implementing the points in this bill. Bill passed unanimously and now moves to the Senate.

HB425: State Educational Sovereignty Act prohibits a local school official from entering into a federal education agreement if the State Board of Education has disallowed participation in the federal program implemented in the federal education agreement. Rep. Patrice Arent and Rep. Merrill Nelson spoke against the bill. The bill passed 42-31 and now moves to the Senate.

Senate Floor (Reported by Sharon Gallagher-Fishbaugh and Mark Mickelsen): TWO BIG VICTORIES FOR THE UEA! SB157: School-Based Budgeting Amendments failed in the Senate by a vote of 11-17. The bill would have required a school district to distribute no less than 85 percent of Minimum School Program revenues to schools. The legislation also proposed requiring school principals to prepare a school budget. The UEA opposed the bill.

Two amendments were proposed and approved. The first allowed principals to opt out of school-based budgeting on an annual basis. The second allowed an exemption for a school district with fewer than 20,000 students. Sen. Pat Jones said the bill would be “a nightmare to administer.” By allowing the opt out, she said, “we will see nothing but problems.”

The UEA had argued that the budgetary knowledge and expertise expected in this legislation would require extensive training for principals and school community council members, or necessitate hiring additional staff or contracting services, in order to develop, evaluate and implement a comprehensive budget at the school level. These would increase costs for schools.

The UEA also argued that a student-based funding formula does not take in to account, or provide accommodation for, the cost differences between schools with a large percentage of more experienced veteran employees compared to schools with a large percentage of novice employees.

Sen. Howard Stephenson, the sponsor, said finances would remain under the school district administration. He said schools would not have to cut paychecks, etc., but they could set a budget and show how revenues will be allocated. Sen. Stephenson said some schools are not getting the money they deserve. He said under his legislation, principals could argue for more money to go to those schools.

SB202: Charter School Funding Amendments failed by a vote of 14-14. The bill would have increased the percentage of district per pupil local revenues that a school district is required to contribute for each resident student enrolled in a charter school. The UEA opposed this bill.

For some districts, the amount is less than 25 percent, as intended by earlier legislation, the sponsor, Sen. Stephenson, told colleagues. He argued that his bill corrects an inequity. Over time, Stephenson said the percentage will increase 2 percent each year, from 25 to 50 percent. Sen. Stephenson said we need to stop funding “phantom students.”

Sen. Jones said she heard from school districts who said this bill will lead to tax increases. She said Grand School District told her they would have to cut services to students if the bill passed. In opposing the bill, the UEA argued that local school boards levy property taxes on their constituents and for their boundaries and this bill would send these taxes outside of their boundaries. The UEA also argued that property taxes are assessed by elected school boards who are accountable for how those funds are expended. Once delivered to charter schools, there is no longer accountability for those funds.

School boards are restricted by statute in how they can expend certain property taxes. In contrast, once distributed to charter schools the funds become unrestricted. Students leaving a school district to attend a charter school do not reduce a district’s fixed costs. Funds leave, but costs remain. Sen. Deidre Henderson made a motion to reconsider, but the motion failed.

SB74: Career and Technical Education Funding for Charter Schools restricts the funding to charter schools that focuses on early high school and technical education. This allows a charter school to receive CTE funding for students enrolled. It passed the Senate unanimously.

SB232 (1st Sub.): School Safety Tip Line establishes a commission to designate the abbreviated dialing code "311" as a statewide School Safety Tip Line and establishes the School Safety Tip Line Commission within the Office of the Attorney General. Sen. Deidre Henderson challenged that the language in the bill opens it up to much more than a suicide threat. She asked if there was a procedure in place to deal with the calls. The bill passed unanimously.


March 11, 2014

House Floor (Reported by Mike Kelley): SB37: Statewide Online Education Program Revisions would require that public schools provide information about online education options. The bill failed in the House 20-50. Several education organizations opposed this bill including school boards’, superintendents’ and principals’ associations.

SB39 (1st Sub.): Home School Amendments eliminates instructional requirements for students who attend a home school and provides that a school may assess a home school student upon reentering the public school system to determine the student’s appropriate placement. The bill passed the House 52-17.

Senate Floor (Reported by Mark Mickelsen): HB286 (2nd Sub.): Child Sexual Abuse Prevention passed 20-8 on second reading. This bill, sponsored by Rep. Angela Romero, requires the State Board of Education to approve instructional materials for child sexual abuse prevention and awareness training and instruction. School districts and charter schools are required to use the instructional materials to provide training to school personnel and the parents or guardians of elementary school students. Schools may not provide instruction unless the parent or guardian of the student is notified and given an opportunity to review the instructional materials. Upon the written request of the parent or guardian, a student can be excused from the instruction.

Sen. Margaret Dayton proposed an amendment, which said an elementary school student “may not be given the instruction…unless the parent or guardian of the student is allowed to be present when the instruction is delivered.” The amendment failed.

“It is important for children to have this background,” said Sen. Pat Jones. “This is about child safety,” said Sen. Osmond, who stated that he was abused as a child. “We need to take a stand and teach our children how to protect themselves.” During the course of what was an emotional Senate debate, two additional senators described how they were abused as children.

HB192: Initiative and Referendum Petition Amendments passed the Senate on a 23-5 vote. The bill adds a statement to a statewide or local initiative petition signature sheet stating that the signer has read, understands and agrees to the law proposed by the petition, or that the signer has read and understands the law the petition seeks to overturn.

SB2: Public Education Budget Amendments passed the Senate 27-0 and now goes to the House for consideration. Sen. Lyle Hillyard highlighted what has been approved for public education for Fiscal Year 2014-15. He said there will be $134.5 million in ongoing funding for public education. There will be $62 million for student enrollment growth and $62.5 million to pay for a 2.5 percent increase in the Weighted Pupil Unit (WPU). The bill also calls for $5 million in one-time funding for teacher supplies. “Our priority is, was, and always will be public education,” Sen. Hillyard said.

HB84 (1st Sub.): School District Amendments failed on second reading. The bill provides that a qualifying city or interlocal agreement participant may not submit for voter approval a measure to create a new school district if the results of a feasibility study shows that the five-year projected average annual revenue of the proposed new school district exceeds the five-year projected average annual cost of the proposed new school district by more than 5 percent. Sen. Aaron Osmond amended the bill to include language providing sufficient school buildings and capital infrastructure to allow all students within the proposed new school district to attend schools within the geographical boundaries of the proposed school district.

HB342 (2nd Sub.): Powers and Duties of the State Board of Education passed the Senate by a vote of 22-4. The bill requires the State Board of Education to establish a timeline for the review of core curriculum standards by a newly-established standards review committee; and directs the Board to take into consideration the comments and recommendations of the review committee in adopting core curriculum standards.

HJR21: Joint Resolution on the Sovereign Character of PILT passed by a vote of 22-2. This joint resolution of the Legislature strongly urges the United States Congress to fully and permanently fund Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) and transfer to the state of the Utah the federally controlled public lands within the state.


March 12, 2014

House Floor (Reported by Jay Blain): SB38 (1st Sub.): Snow College Concurrent Enrollment Amendments requires Snow College to establish a concurrent enrollment program that will allow students to be able to earn an Associate’s Degree via distance learning in a two-year cycle. The bill passed unanimously and now goes to the Governor.

SB43: Intergenerational Poverty Interventions in Public Schools establishes a grant program providing after-school programs for students living in situations of intergenerational poverty. The bill allocates $1 million for a grant program available to school districts based upon criteria to be developed by USOE. It passed the Senate 68-2 and now goes to the Governor for signature.

Senate Floor (Reported by Mark Mickelsen): The Senate unanimously concurred with House amendments to SB39 (1st Sub.): Home School Amendments. This bill modifies procedures for excusing from public school attendance a school-age minor who attends a home school, eliminates instructional requirements, and specifies procedures for the placement of a home school student who transfers to a public school. Sen. Aaron Osmond agreed to concur with a House amendment which says parents moving home-schooled students back into public school will confer with the principal on where to place the student. The bill now goes to the Governor for signature.

HB4: Current School Year Supplemental Public Education Budget Amendments passed by a vote of 28-0. This bill modifies education funding for school districts, charter schools and certain state agencies for the 2013-14 fiscal year.

HB286 (2nd Sub.): Child Sexual Abuse Prevention passed 20-8. This bill, sponsored by Rep. Angela Romero, requires the State Board of Education to approve instructional materials for child sexual abuse prevention and awareness training and instruction. School districts and charter schools are required to use the instructional materials to provide training to school personnel and the parents or guardians of elementary school students.

Schools may not provide instruction unless the parent or guardian of the student is notified and given an opportunity to review the instructional materials. Upon the written request of the parent or guardian, a student can be excused from the instruction. Sen. John Valentine made an amendment that says participation of a student requires compliance with the Utah Family Education Rights and Privacy Act. The amendment passed. The House later concurred with the amendment.

HB96: Utah School Readiness Initiative passed 17-10. This bill creates the School Readiness Board, which provides grants for early childhood education programs, and may enter into certain contracts with private entities to provide funding for early childhood education programs for at-risk students. HB96 has a $3 million fiscal note. Money will be taken out of the General Fund.

HB223: School Board Elections Provisions was circled. This bill requires the direct, nonpartisan election of members to the State Board of Education and repeals the involvement of the governor and the nominating and recruiting committee for the State Board of Education in the selection process. The bill previously failed in the Senate Education Committee on a 3-3 vote. Sen. Reid circled the bill because under Senate rules a bill that failed in committee cannot be placed on the board. The UEA supports this legislation.


March 13, 2014

Concert Sponsorship (Reported by Mike Kelley): The five members of the singing group Beyond 5 performed during lunchtime in the Capitol Rotunda, courtesy of the UEA. Band members helped celebrate the final day of the 2014 Legislative Session by sharing several songs with school groups and other onlookers. The UEA Legislative Team also arranged for the band to have a private meeting with the Governor and Lieutenant Governor.

Senate Floor (Reported by Mark Mickelsen): HB150 (3rd Sub.): Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Amendments passed by a vote of 27-0. The bill, which carries a $20 million fiscal note, includes a provision calling for high quality professional development for educators related to STEM education in grades K-12, creates financial incentives for educators to earn an elementary or secondary STEM education endorsement, and expands the scope of STEM education to include students in grades 7 and 8. Enactment of this bill will result in an appropriation of $5 million ongoing from the General Fund and $15 million one-time from the General Fund to the STEM Action Center.

HB337: Teacher Salary Supplement Program Amendments passed by a vote of 21-0. This bill replaces the Department of Human Resource Management with the State Board of Education as the administrator of the Teacher Salary Supplement Program.

HCR10: Concurrent Resolution on School and Institutional Trust Lands Exchange Act passed 26-0. This concurrent resolution of the Legislature and the Governor urges the United States Congress to enact legislation affirming the federal land grant process and eliminating barriers to federal-state land exchanges.

HB3: Appropriations Adjustments (Bill of Bills) passed 28-0. This bill provides budget increases and decreases for state agencies, public education, higher education and funds for bills with fiscal impact passed during the 2014 session.

SB34 (3rd Sub.): Statewide Data Alliance and Utah Futures passed as amended in the House by a vote of 24-0. The bill was reconsidered in the House after failing on a 16-48 vote earlier in the day. When the amended bill came back to the Senate, sponsor Sen. Howard Stephenson made a motion to concur with the House action.

HB111: School Building Cost Reporting passed by a vote of 26-0. This bill enacts language to require a local education agency to submit a capital outlay report for publication on the Utah Public Finance Website.

House Floor (Reported by Jay Blain and Mike Kelley): During debate on SB40 (1st Sub.): Financial and Economic Literacy Amendments, it was mentioned that Utah is one of only four states to have a financial literacy class and we still lead the nation in bankruptcies. This bill requires an online end-of-course assessment, professional development for the teachers and an endorsement program for financial literacy. It also provides for the course to be included in the core curriculum. The bill passed 62-6.

SB131 (1st Sub.): Student Leadership Grant would renew this program. Rep. Joel Briscoe explained why he changed his nay vote on this bill from last year to being a cosponsor this year, because it is working and they are doing evaluation of the program. Even though this program doesn’t teach academic skills it does teach other skills that are very important, for example, how to get along with others, he said. The bill passed 67-1.

SB34 (3rd Sub.): Statewide Data Alliance and Utah Futures initially failed in the House 16-48. After an amendment, Rep. Joel Briscoe requested that the bill be reconsidered. It then passed 69-5. The UEA opposed the original bill, but not the amended bill.

SB56 (1st Sub.): Risk Management Amendments says that a school is not held liable when the building is used for a civic activity. The bill passed the House 65-6.

SB80 (1st Sub.): Statewide Online Education Amendments would define what an IEP is for a special education online student. It also defines what dual enrollment is for a special education student who takes online courses and courses from the local school district or charter school. The failed in the House 11-61.

SB93 (1st Sub): Internal Audit Amendments establishes the Governor’s Office of Internal Audit Services and enacts provisions related to the auditing of state agencies and school districts. It passed the House by a vote of 40-31. The UEA opposed this bill.

SB101: Public Education Human Resource Management Amendments extends the deadline for full implementation of the new evaluation system by one year. The bill passed the House unanimously. This was one of the UEA’s priority bills.

SB104: Improvement of Reading Instruction was amended to provide $475,000 to expand the University of Utah Reading Clinic. The bill passed the House 70-2.

SB113: Public Meetings Amendments ensures that official meetings held at the Capitol Complex by different groups that include legislators are published on the main Capitol schedule. The bill passed the House 49-21.

SB122 (2nd Sub.): Parental Rights in Public Education specifies certain rights of parents, including the right to retain a student on grade level, make teacher requests, excuse absences for vacations and health care, and accommodate the parent’s determination of level of rigor. The UEA worked extensively with the sponsor to create a bill that was acceptable to teachers. It passed the House 68-1.

SB131 (1st Sub.): Student Leadership Grant requires a school that receives a grant to set school-wide goals for the student leadership skills development program. The bill passed the House 67-1.

SB140: Advanced Placement Testing provides funding for Advanced Placement test fees for low income students. The UEA supports this bill. It passed the House a vote of 65-4.

SB150: Education Task Force Reauthorization allows for the continuation of the Education Task Force for another year. The bill passed the House unanimously.

SB209: School Grading Revisions makes changes to the school grading law passed last year. It passed the House on a vote of 62-12.

SB218: Charter School Amendments gives priority to charter schools in a high growth area and lower priority for charter schools in low or no growth areas. The bill passed the House 67-4.

SB232: School Safety Tip Line provides for the creation of a statewide phone number (311) to provide a means for a public school student, parent, school employee, or citizen to make an anonymous report concerning unsafe, violent, or criminal activities, or the threat of such activities. It passed the House 67-2.

SB240: Carson Smith Scholarship Amendments passed the House 69-3. The bill changes requirements relating to the application deadline for the Carson Smith Scholarship Program.

SB257: Parent Review of Instructional Materials and Curriculum would require a parent panel to hear complaints about public school curriculum and have the State Board of Education publish a report of these complaints on its website. It required a “call to the House” for all representatives to vote, but it narrowly passed on a vote of 38-37.

SB258: Educator Licensure Amendments originally would have provided that educators from another state who provide distance learning are not required to obtain a license issued by the State Board of Education. The bill was amended to say that online teaching satisfies the work experience requirement for participation in an alternative preparation program. It passed the House 69-6.

The following bills did not pass by virtue of the fact they were not heard by the House before the Midnight deadline: