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Public Education Budget

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Unveiled budget proposes 3% WPU increase – February 12, 2018

After deliberating for three weeks, the Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee recommended a 3% WPU increase, full funding of enrollment growth and paying for property tax equalization from the Education Fund. Total funding proposed by the subcommittee is about $157 million for the big items and about $40 million for the smaller items, for a total of about $197 million total ongoing. Here are a few highlights:

Big items—

  • Enrollment growth: $33,488,500
  • WPU Increase (3%): $93,000,000
  • Equity Funding (SB145): $33,000,000

Smaller Items (all ongoing money, additional to current budgets)—

  • Teacher Supplies: $500,000
  • CANVAS LMS (in conjunction with UETN): $1,900,000
  • Elementary Counseling (HB264): $2,100,000
  • Enhancement for At-Risk: $10,000,000
  • UPSTART (SB115): $1,000,000
  • Digital Teaching and Learning Expansion: $6,000,000
  • Special Education Intensive Services: $2,000,000
  • To and From Pupil Transportation: $4,500,000
  • Special Education Scholarships (Carson Smith expansion): $2,000,000
  • K-3 Reading Growth: $3,500,000

View the full proposed budget. The budget recommendation now goes to the Executive Appropriations Committee for further consideration.


How the Public Education Budget is Set - January 30, 2018

The first few weeks of the session, legislators meet in appropriations committee meetings where they consider appropriations requests received from various entities. There are eight appropriation subcommittees, including the Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee. Each subcommittee considers appropriation requests relevant that topic, then prioritize requests and submit a budget proposal to the Executive Appropriations Committee for final approval. The Executive Appropriations Committee is made up of Senate and House leadership and is responsible for setting the final budget for the upcoming year. This final budget is then voted upon by the full House and Senate, usually during the session’s closing days.


Few public education budget details emerge during legislature's first week – January 26, 2018

Budget negotiations are in very early stages with the Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee hearing reports from various entities. The Subcommittee discussed HB1: Public Education Base Budget Amendments, the primary funding bill for public education, which essentially sets the next year’s budget before any new money is considered. Any increases to the “base budget” are typically decided in a supplemental budget bill near the end of the session.


UEA Supports Governor’s Proposed FY2019 Education Budget – December 13, 2017

 

Photo: Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune

Association still has concerns about addressing teacher shortage and class sizes

The Utah Education Association supports Governor Gary Herbert’s public education budget recommendations directing increased funding for the Weighted Pupil Unit (WPU), student enrollment growth, at-risk student populations and providing educators with additional classroom supply money. The statewide teachers’ association remains concerned, however, that the state’s current tax structure generates insufficient revenue to make significant improvements in a public education system plagued by severe teacher shortages and large class sizes.

“The governor’s proposed increase for public education is a significant and worthwhile investment in Utah’s schoolchildren and the state’s economy,” said UEA President Heidi Matthews. “His recommendation to increase the WPU combined with an additional investments in at-risk student programs and property tax equalization gets us very close to the 5.5 percent WPU increase the UEA and other education stakeholders are seeking.”

During a press conference Dec. 13, Governor Herbert released his proposed FY2019 Utah state budget. In it he directs $208 million in new tax revenue to public education, calling for $36 million to cover anticipated enrollment increases and another $121 million to add 4 percent to the WPU. The budget also proposes $34 million in new money for children at risk of academic failure and $25 million for property tax equalization. The Legislative Fiscal Analyst has announced the state can expect an overall $382 million increase in state tax revenue for the next fiscal year. In his remarks, Governor Herbert attributed the revenue increase to a booming state economy.

“We must seriously look at updating Utah’s tax structure if we want any hope for addressing critical issues such as our ongoing teacher shortage, overburdened public school workforce and the nation’s largest class sizes,” said Matthews. “While we applaud the governor for proposing a budget that directs 72 percent of all new revenue to education, I am unconvinced that growing the economy alone is sufficient to deliver the resources our students need.”Matthews points to the ‘Our Schools Now’ initiative as one way to address the tax structure issue. If approved by voters, the business-led initiative would generate about $700 million per year for Utah schools – money that would go directly to Utah classrooms. According to initiative organizers, the money could be used to reduce class sizes, increase teacher pay, provide updated technology in schools, add counselors and specialists, or for other needs determined locally by the school.

“The business community started the ‘Our Schools Now’ initiative because they recognize the positive impact a world-class public education system has on the economy,” Matthews said. “As Utah’s economy grows, educator compensation, teacher training and classroom resources must keep pace if we want to attract and retain quality public school classroom teachers.“Utah teachers have stepped up and done more with less for many years. Now it’s time for our legislators to step up and recognize the importance of investing in our students,” Matthews said.

WPU Gets 4% Boost, Educator Licence Fees Now Paid – March 13, 2017

By most accounts, public education fared well coming out of this year’s legislative session, considering the work done with the revenues available. Approximately 57 percent of new money available was allocated to public education.

Here are some budget highlights from House Bill 2, which provides new public education funding:

  • A 4 percent increase on the WPU ($116 million);
  • Fully funding of student growth ($64 million);
  • Ongoing funding for teacher supply money reimbursement ($5 million);
  • Payment for educator licensing fees ($2.6 million ongoing);
  • Ongoing funding for the Regional Service Centers ($2 million dollars); and
  • Funding for a Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind building in Utah County ($10.5 million).

The education budget process started late in the fall of 2016 with various education groups making funding proposals to the Governor. The UEA’s proposal called for a 7.5% increase in the Weighted Pupil Unit (WPU), 2.5 percent just to remain even and 5 percent to make progress in public education funding. This request, while aggressive, recognized that current the Utah tax system is not meeting the needs of Utah’s public schools and students and that additional sources of new revenue are needed. In his proposed budget released in December 2016, Governor Gary Herbert called for a 4 percent WPU increase.

During early weeks of the session, the Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee met and made an original proposal for a 3 percent increase on the WPU. The 4 percent WPU increase was the result of tremendous effort by the legislators involved in the process and involvement by the UEA, local governance and staff, and educators contacting their legislators.

No new long-term revenues for education funding were passed this session despite a great deal of talk about education funding prompted by the proposed Our School Now ballot initiative. While many new funding options were discussed, only two actually made it to a vote. A proposal to raise income taxes on high-income earners (Senate Bill 141 by Senator Jim Dabakis) failed in the Senate Revenue and Taxation Committee.

Senate Bill 255 by Senator Howard Stephenson would have generated about $20 million per year over five years by freezing the basic property tax rate. This proposal was later combined with Senate Bill 80 that would use the new money to equalize property tax funding. SB255 passed the Senate, but time ran out on the last day before the newly combined bill could be considered in the House.

With no major new funding, there is still work to be done to find a solution to the chronic underfunding of Utah’s public schools. Even Governor Herbert acknowledged this fact when he said that the Our Schools Now initiative needs to go forward because it is causing people to talk about the school funding issue. 


Public Education Budget Archives